Exhibition stand management on-site

Exhibition on-site logistics tips

On-Site Logistics

Build-up – Arrive during the build of the stand. Prepare the stand for display with any graphics, audio visual equipment, furniture in position, hardware, brochures, give-aways, catering etc.

  • Store any additional travel boxes with stand builder or in exhibition storage area.
  • Check all boxes and items have been delivered to the stand or collect them as required.
  • Prepare and give to company representatives and exhibitors their stand roster schedule. Make sure that you have the right combination of expertise on the stand at all times and that you have scheduled meal and coffee breaks.
  • Let all staff know who is the official company spokesperson should you have press coming to the stand.
  • Inform staff of any competitions and how they work, and how the lead forms are filled in and processed.
  • Perform a practice run with all equipment to check it is working. Rehearse any presentation.
  • Inform staff who is in charge of the stand and what each person’s role and responsibilities are.
  • If press packs are required deliver them to the press centre.
  • Re-confirm any booked meeting rooms.
  • Re-confirm times, places and staff attending any hospitality events such as parties, drinks receptions and dinners.

Logistics during Show

  • Before the show opens make sure that you arrive first before the opening of exhibition hall so that you can unlock the office and storage areas and make sure that everything is ready and working before the tradeshow opens.
  • During the show check the stock levels of give-aways, display literature and catering.
  • Make sure that staff do not put all their coats and bags in the back office rather than in the cloakroom where they should be.
  • Make sure that you or another designated person is allocated the responsibility for turning equipment off or locking up at the end of the day.
  • At the end of the day run through any logistics for the next day and identify any problems experienced and communicate what can be done better. Then unwind with staff informally.
  • Take plenty of photos of stand during the show.
  • Collect leads and, if appropriate, make sure that those back at the office prepare any follow up that is required.

Close of Show logistics

  • Allocate duties and responsibilities to staff regarding the close of show and tear down. Debrief staff.
  • Collect any storage boxes.
  • Clearly label any boxes that are returning to the home office.
  • Make sure items from the stand are packed securely and put away. Use your inventory check list for this.
  • Arrange for the transportation of any boxes. If items are being collected by the stand builder make sure that they know which these are and confirm when you expect them back in the office.

In the final tip we will be outlining follow up process from the exhibition and feedback.

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Use Your Events Budget for a Corporate Christmas Charity Event

It isn’t just the endless TV re-runs of Scrooged pricking the corporate conscience that makes Christmas the optimum time for charitable giving – although many companies actively seek out opportunities to demonstrate corporate responsibility throughout the year, Christmas really is the time which really brings out the best in businesses, and their employees.

So, as well as setting aside some funds for an employee event to celebrate the festive season, Christmas could also offer your company the chance to spend some of the events budget on the gift of giving for the wider community. What’s more, by incorporating a little corporate social responsibility into a Christmas team event, you’ll be promoting additional goodwill to your employees, something which is certainly relevant to the budget and the time of year!

Making sense of corporate social responsibility

But why is corporate social responsibility important? At its most basic, corporate social responsibility involves the conducting of business in an ethical way which recognises the impact of the business (activities, production, location etc) at social, economical and environmental levels, and locally, nationally or even internationally.

As such, it is something which is not only important but highly relevant to all businesses, big or small. Demonstrating sound practices in corporate social responsibility openly and transparently – including sharing it with both staff and customers – goes a long way towards building a sound business reputation and trust in the company or brand.

Of course, corporate social responsibility within the business itself can take many forms, for example: such as through Fair Trading, ethical sourcing of components or carbon-neutral manufacturing, but many businesses fall short of demonstrating recognition of their social responsibility, particularly within the local community. Supporting a local charity as part of a corporate event is another way to share the responsibility and allow both employees (and possibly clients) to be involved in the company’s local area and some of the ‘greater good’ that the company is doing.

Best benefits?

The purpose of charitable acts is of course to support a cause, whether this is through raising funds for, or raising awareness of, the cause itself. However, when supporting a charity at a business level, there are plenty of additional benefits to all of those involved:

  • Team building: Nothing brings even the most disparate of teams together like a charity event and including work teams into a Christmas event offers a real chance for teams to bond as individuals, explore their own strengths and weaknesses on an ‘alternative’ task and is a great exercise in working together for a common goal which actually supports someone else.
  • Publicity and PR: Being involved with the charity sector is excellent for public relations and demonstrates dedication to local community, regional, national and international issues or concerns. Any publicity and marketing for the event also particularly benefits charities by raising public awareness of their existence, the work they do and the support that they offer. This is often of most benefit to small charities which cannot afford to pay for publicity themselves.
  • Employee retention: Loyalty, value and worth are all qualities which employees need to feel from the management, in order to pride themselves on their role in the company and the work they undertake. Offering employees the chance to demonstrate their worth by getting involved in something fun and giving (on work’s time) is a great way to bring staff together and help them to recognise how much the company values the work they do, in the context of valuing and supporting a charity or good cause. The goodwill generated from this kind of event can increase employee satisfaction and the potential for employees to stay with the company in the longer term.
  • Communication: Working together on a group task, and in support of a charity, is a great way to break down communication barriers and enhance specific skills, such as participation, instruction giving and following. For teams which mostly work virtually, physically working together can establish an additional communication bond and allow participants the opportunity to experience new ways of working and a greater understanding of each other’s’ skills and strengths.
  • Another goal, another role: One of the key things about plopping the team into a completely different activity with an alternative, neutral goal in mind (ie: the charity or the event task rather than the business) is that everyone gets the chance to take on a different role. Those who would normally lead the team can contribute to the performance from within the team, whilst another person can take a role in organisation and delegation of tasks. This is training at its most alternative and fun, which also offers plenty of scope for follow-up in appraisal.

Of course, it’s all very well seeing what can be achieved from demonstrating a bit of corporate social responsibility at Christmas, but what kind of events could your company put on to help achieve this?

Santa fun run

Paying for employees to take part in a charity Santa run (including the fees and the paid time off to participate) can be great for morale, as well as fitness. Supporting staff with a training schedule and even group sessions from a personal trainer can demonstrate your investment in their success (and health) and can also help to revive stalling production and employee motivation, as well as raise cash for charity.

Christmas Bake-Off

Hosting a Christmas bake-off is a great way to get teams working together creatively and in one of the most trending ways currently. Bakers from all levels of business are mixed together to face the same challenges as the candidates from the popular BBC show, including Masterclass and technical tasks. As well as the fun of participation and treat-based production, sessions end with the bakers choosing to sell off the baked goodies, donate them to a local charity or ensure they are well received as birthday cakes for a needy family, as organised by Free Cakes UK.

Christmas build-a-bike

Team building and charitable giving combine with the challenge of putting together high quality bikes, which can then be donated to the team or company’s chosen charity. The team don’t need to be engineers, just willing and up for the challenge of acquiring the parts and materials before all working together to build a bike for charity. For additional fun, competing teams can be pitched against each other to finish first and then pass-on the know-how to other teams before everyone passes on the bikes to the chosen recipients.

Charity Treasure Hunting

There isn’t much which is more festive than London’s Christmas lights and Team Tactics offers the opportunity to complete this challenge against the seasonal sights of London’s city scenery. Charity treasure hunts involve a style modelled on the frantic searches of The Apprentice, with plenty of chances for teams to hone skills and share a great day out, all whilst raising funds for charity.

Whatever your corporate Christmas calendar holds, extending the events budget to include something completely different like a charity event can be a great way to demonstrate your social awareness and thank your teams – and local charities – for all their hard work throughout the year.

Guest Blog from Team Tactics Ltd

 

Tips – Final Preparation Before Going On-site at an Exhibition

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Preparation Just Before Going On-Site

You have done your check list and double checked that everything has been ordered and re-confirmed this with your suppliers. You have gone through the timeline and made sure that you are up to date and have everything ready to go. Now use this list to remind yourself of other things you need to have achieved:

  • Check all monies and invoices have been paid.
  • Check you have ordered any necessary:
    • Power
    • Telecommunications facilities
    • Equipment
    • Stand cleaning
    • Insurance
    • Furniture
    • Floral displays
    • Catering
  • Check and inform the appropriate people of any travel arrangements, hotel accommodation and meeting rooms that you have booked.
  • If you are having any speakers represent your company at any of the sessions make sure that they have travel and hotel bookings and that these have been confirmed. Check that they have been sent their seminar session information including session times, plans of the conference rooms and exhibition layout.
  • Make sure that any staff who are due to attend and help have been sent details of the exhibition, including your stand number and hall. They will need to know what days and times they are attending and when to meet, and they will need a show plan.
  • Have a conference call or meeting with everyone attending to run through the schedule of the show and what is expected from their participation.
  • Make sure all staff to understand the objectives and goals you want to achieve at this exhibition.
  • Prepare staff – make sure they have a complete knowledge of your company and its products and services, both current and new, and also that they know the relevant market trends and competition so that they are able to talk effectively with prospective customers.
  • Run though pre-training required by staff and make sure they are familiar with any equipment, demonstrations or presentations that they will need to use or refer to.
  • Run through the process of lead collection and allocate staff in the home office to follow up these appropriately as soon as possible after they have been generated.
  • Make an inventory and pack items to be taken to the show, such as literature, give-aways and lead forms as well as equipment, software and stock. These can often be delivered to the show by the stand builders or by using the services of a transportation freighting company. Make sure that if you are exhibiting in a non-EU country that you have filled out the correct customs forms for clearance and re-entry back to your home country.
  • Confirm that freight has arrived and all contractors are on schedule.
  • Check that you have sent out badges or passes as required.
  • Prepare an exhibition handbook with all information about the exhibition and your company’s participation, as well as supplier contact and names.
  • Plan to travel out during the build-up of the stand to make sure all is running to schedule and that you are there to supervise the stand build. Take photo of stand before show opening.

The next blog tip will be live on-site logistics

launch-checklist

Final Check for Exhibitor to review before going to a Tradeshow

Preparation Just Before Going On-Site

You have done your check list and double checked that everything has been ordered and re-confirmed this with your suppliers. You have gone through the timeline and made sure that you are up to date and have everything ready to go. Now use this list to remind yourself of other things you need to have achieved:

  • Check all monies and invoices have been paid.
  • Check you have ordered any necessary:
    • Power
    • Telecommunications facilities
    • Equipment
    • Stand cleaning
    • Insurance
    • Furniture
    • Floral displays
    • Catering
  • Check and inform the appropriate people of any travel arrangements, hotel accommodation and meeting rooms that you have booked.
  • If you are having any speakers represent your company at any of the sessions make sure that they have travel and hotel bookings and that these have been confirmed. Check that they have been sent their seminar session information including session times, plans of the conference rooms and exhibition layout.
  • Make sure that any staff who are due to attend and help have been sent details of the exhibition, including your stand number and hall. They will need to know what days and times they are attending and when to meet, and they will need a show plan.
  • Have a conference call or meeting with everyone attending to run through the schedule of the show and what is expected from their participation.
  • Make sure all staff to understand the objectives and goals you want to achieve at this exhibition.
  • Prepare staff – make sure they have a complete knowledge of your company and its products and services, both current and new, and also that they know the relevant market trends and competition so that they are able to talk effectively with prospective customers.
  • Run though pre-training required by staff and make sure they are familiar with any equipment, demonstrations or presentations that they will need to use or refer to.
  • Run through the process of lead collection and allocate staff in the home office to follow up these appropriately as soon as possible after they have been generated.
  • Make an inventory and pack items to be taken to the show, such as literature, give-aways and lead forms as well as equipment, software and stock. These can often be delivered to the show by the stand builders or by using the services of a transportation freighting company. Make sure that if you are exhibiting in a non-EU country that you have filled out the correct customs forms for clearance and re-entry back to your home country.
  • Confirm that freight has arrived and all contractors are on schedule.
  • Check that you have sent out badges or passes as required.
  • Prepare an exhibition handbook with all information about the exhibition and your company’s participation, as well as supplier contact and names.
  • Plan to travel out during the build-up of the stand to make sure all is running to schedule and that you are there to supervise the stand build. Take photo of stand before show opening.
  • Final check all travel/accommodation arrangements and information to arrive exhibition in time for the build up.
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Tips on Marketing and Publicity for Exhibitors – Marketing your Trade Show Attendance

For every exhibition there will be a variety of marketing strategies that you can use to
promote your stand, brand, business, services, products and expertise. The key to successful promotion is to use the right combination of strategies.

First you will need to know what your objectives are for exhibiting at the trade show in order to determine which forms of marketing suit your promotion. To get any attendee to your stand they need to perceive value, have an experience, or learn in some way. You will need to make sure you have a targeted and up‐to‐date database of contacts.

Traditional Marketing Media

Traditional marketing can include:

Press releases and invitations of journalists to a press conference or briefing at the
show.

Personal invitations to hospitality events or face‐to‐face meetings offered in
advance. You will need to offer them something of value like access to decision
makers and your top management.Invitations including hardcopies of the trade show registration giving an indication
of why they should visit your stand.

Database mailshots with phone follow‐up.

Promotion of a contest or prize draw they can enter or giveaways they can collect
on the stand.

Newsletter to current clients and prospects telling them what you will be doing at
the show and what you will be demonstrating. This can promote any speaking
opportunities you have as well as use competitions and giveaways, and it can
describe the hospitality you’ll offer on the stand.

Business introducers, using face‐to‐face communication to promote your attendance
at a trade show. Make sure all employees are promoting the exhibition at every
opportunity when talking to clients, prospects and third parties.

General correspondence – make sure your exhibition at the trade show is mentioned
in some shape or form on all correspondence that leaves the office, such as fax
headers, note pads, and compliment slips. Create leaflets to include in any
correspondence you send out. You can also use giveaways to promote the event.

SMS messaging. Short texts are great way of reminding attendees of the event, and
sending updates to them about what is happening.
On‐line and Social Media
Many of the above‐mentioned traditional forms of marketing can be done using email
marketing.

Email campaign. This is an excellent way to market your event if you already have
permission to contact the customer or prospect. Often the collection of contact
details through the website for newsletters can be excellent for sending electronic
invitations. The exhibition can be promoted on every email sent from the office with
an additional line on the signature, specifying the stand location and number.

The company website. This can be used to promote all your events on your
corporate website under a specific tab heading of events.

LinkedIn, Facebook, Blogs and YouTube. All of the social media platforms your
company use should promote your exhibition details in advance, especially if you can
engage with potential prospects before the event.


Twitter used in combination with links to your website can be powerful in making
information about your show available to real and potential attendees in an easy‐to read
steady stream. This method is a great vehicle for generating buzz about your
conference.You will need to choose a great hashtag. A hashtag can be included in the
body of each tweet and is a short phrase preceded by a hash (#) symbol. By making a hashtag that is short and easy, other tweets can reference your conference using the tag.

  • Mention your hashtag far in advance of the conference and include in all
    your related publicity – don’t wait until the day the event starts!
  • Tweet white papers, videos, and presentations, as attachments. These can
    be teasers for your trade show appearance or even a reminder of your
    offerings.
  • A great time to send tweets promoting your appearance is a few weeks
    before the trade show. You can offer teaser photos of a new product
    appearing at the trade show or announce the details of an executive who
    will be a keynote speaker.
  • Include hashtag in all print and digital material.
  • Make sure your Twitter profile has the full name, date, location of your
    conference and a pitch about the conference.
  • Encourage your sponsors, exhibitors and speakers to include your hashtag in
    all their conference‐related postings.

Mobile Apps ‐The need for mobile trade show apps is greater than ever. Trade shows
are all about showcasing products or services in a short amount of time. You need to
let attendees know about a special discount, or send out a push notification within
seconds. There are a variety of developers of mobile apps such as CrowdCompass.

  • A mobile trade show app means faster and more efficient marketing. It
    means measurable results for your exhibitors and sponsors.
  • Mobile trade show apps also give exhibitors and sponsors more
    opportunities to make stronger connections with existing customers and
    reach out to new ones. It is one way to drive interaction and engagement
    between the company and attendees.
  • A mobile trade show app helps you think outside the booth to improve the
    overall event experience and stay ahead of the competition. These apps can
    be created for most smart devices such as Android, iPhone, and iPad.

As mentioned before you need to use the best method of promoting your trade show
attendance to your market and potential customers. The main point is to make your
attendance known so that those coming to the show know of your presence and want to visit your stand. It does not matter how good your stand and products are if you don’t get footfall and generate leads to your products.

Tips on Marketing and Publicity for Exhibitors – Promoting your Exhibition

Your marketing and publicity should be part of your whole marketing plan for exhibiting. Trade shows are a powerful element of the marketing mix in that they enable you to have face to face conversations with your customers and prospects, and to gather sales leads.

Your business and brand needs to be known to potential customers who are attending the trade show. The attendees will gravitate towards the brands that are familiar, visible and readily available to them. You want as many of the right kind of attendees to come to your stand.

Image result for photos marketing exhibitions

You need to ensure that you meet the right people, set up productive meetings and drive traffic to your stand. To do this you need to make sure that your marketing is targeted to the right attendees: those who will be interested in your products and who could potentially lead to a sale.

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Depending on your budget there are different types of marketing and ways of promoting your exhibit at a trade show. Some are free and others are chargeable. There are also different ways of marketing and promoting your presence at a trade show.

We will look at the various ways of promoting your event in this tip blog  and then in the next blog tip we will look at the different types of traditional and on-line marketing that you should consider using.

When you start the planning process you need to finalise the theme of the exhibition. All the marketing and communications of the company exhibition and promotion should have the same branding and look-and-feel. All communication about the exhibition should make consistent use of the appearance and branding. If you are highlighting new products then the communications and graphics should reflect the same graphical design.

The Promotion of the Event

  • The marketing of your exhibition is not just about the promotion of the stand and brand but it is also integral to promoting your business, services, and expertise.
  • Whatever marketing methods you adopt make sure you measure the results. This is so that you can determine the most effective method of getting people to your stand and so that you can analyse your Return on Investment (ROI).
  • Make sure that all your promotion is highly focused and correctly targeted.
  • Consider all possible methods of communication because different people like to receive communication in different ways. Use the full range of traditional offline promotion as well as online promotion and social media.

We will outline the marketing and promotion of exhibitions in three sections:

  • Promotion through the Trade Show organisation. (This blog)
  • Traditional Marketing Media promotion. (next blog tip)
  • On-line, Social Media. (next blog tip)

Promotion through a Trade Show Organisation

If you are exhibiting at a trade show then you should not just rely on the organising company to promote the event because you want to stand out from the other competitors and companies who will be promoted at the same time. Do, however, take advantage of their promotional publication to advertise your company stand and products because they will use their large database of previous and new attendees who are already targeted into your market. Promotional opportunities provided by the organisers will vary from trade show to trade show but usually consist of:

  • Promotion of your company in their catalogue of exhibitors. This usually requires a short abstract about your company, what it is that you are promoting, a list of products, photos of the products, and stand location and contact details.
  • An entry onto their website again listing your company products and contact information. Remember products can be searched and products cross-linked.
  • PR article for their newsletter promotion.
  • Advertising on website or pre-event magazine.
  • Sponsorship opportunities. These will be chargeable, but your brand or company name will be promoted on banners, on part of the website, on promotion media and at the exhibition.
  • Taking advantage of speaker opportunities that may arise if the trade show is running an educational seminar or is associated with a specific conference connected to the market segment into which you are marketing.
  • Use the trade show logo on your in-house marketing material and emails to advertise that your company will be exhibiting.

In summary you need to use the best method of promoting your trade show attendance to your market and potential customers. The main point is to make your attendance at the show known so that those coming are aware of your presence and want to visit your stand. It does not matter how good your stand and products are if you don’t get footfall and generate leads to your products.

Tips on Sending out a brief to Exhibition Stand designers for Space Only Booth/Stands and Graphics

Once you have prepared your strategy and objectives for attending an exhibition, completed the trade show Marketing Plan and prepared the budget you will know how much money you have to spend on the exhibition stand and the graphics.

Following on from the last blog we will concentrate on Space only bespoke booths/stands and the related graphics for stands.

Space only hire of floor space is best for making a bigger impression by allowing a bespoke stand to be designed and built to your own specifications. It is very important for your exhibition stand to give the right impression in order to showcase your brand, company and products. Confirm with the stand designer and builder that they will give you full management control from concept to completion. The stand building company can also transport and erect the stand before the exhibition, and then afterwards de-rig and transport the stand back to your company or keep it in storage.

Tips when sending out a brief to a stand designer:

  • Decide if you want to hire the stand for a one-off exhibition or if you have quite a few exhibitions you are attending. You may want to purchase your own stand and reuse it. Make sure that the company can store the stand and refurbish it as required. There will be an additional cost for this with each exhibition but the overall cost should be less than if you were starting from scratch each time.
  • Know your budget for each component of your exhibition project. It is important that the stand designer also keeps within budget that there are no hidden costs.
  • The stand designer needs to understand your company ethos.
  • The designer needs to know what it is you will be exhibiting whether hardware or software, retail items etc.
  • The designer needs to know what you would like included in the available floor area, like a small meeting room, storage, presentation area, demonstration area, reception information desk etc.
  • The designer needs to know your marketing theme, what look and feel you would like at the exhibition, and whether it needs to follow your brand marketing or promotion.
  • The designer needs to have an idea of the graphics you would like and how these will fit onto the stand walls etc.
  • Research the stand designers and decide what designs in the past they have done that you like and whether they have used the materials you are thinking of using for your stand.
  • Get examples of previous successful stands that they have created so you can refer to them in your brief.
  • Make you brief as full as possible including what you want to achieve so that the stand designer and builder can respond as closely to your requirements.
  • Send out briefs to no more than three designers; any more becomes overkill.

 Graphic Tips

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  • Get a design agency or marketing department to design what you want to say about the brand and incorporate into the graphics.
  • Keep to corporate colours, logo and trademark for your brands.
  • Promote the key brand that you are there to exhibit.
  • Keep graphics simple and visual; too much information looks messy.
  • Remember the audience are walking past and they need to know what your company does or products you sell, as easily as possible.