Tag Archives: building a database

Tips on How to Run a Successful Exhibition: Finding the right exhibition for your company to exhibit at

Before signing up to attend an exhibition which is a large undertaking both in commitment to time, people and money you need to undertake market analysis and understand your company’s market, its market strategy and its objectives.

Market Analysis of Your Company Market and Objectives

Before researching which exhibition to attend you first need to understand your own company’s specific marketing objectives and strategy. This includes:

  • Market environment, and market share trends
  • Your customers
  • Your competition using SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threats) analysis
  • Your company strategy and marketing objectives

Research

It is essential that you undertake research about the exhibition before deciding to book a stand space. Unfortunately many companies fail to do this, resulting in very poor outcomes, being out of pocket and putting off exhibiting at further exhibitions in the future.

The simple way of researching whether to attend a trade show is to ask the exhibition organisers for last year’s exhibitors lists and visitor attendance records including demographics of attendees numbers, job roles etc.

Speak to previous exhibitors to find out their experiences and return on investment. It is amazing the information that can be gleaned in this way. For example comments might include, “The show was good but we were in the wrong hall, Hall 2 had most people because that was where the restaurant was”. Or “Yes there were lots of exhibition visitors but unfortunately they were not the decision makers.” The exhibition industry, like most others, has a series of professional publications that list the major events around the world.

The credentials of any show can be established by checking how long it has been going and its relevance to the products or services on offer. Also consider the exhibition’s ability to attract the market leaders to exhibit, and the decision makers to visit and the level of advertising and promotion for the event.

Exhibition Publications

Before you book trade show stands it is imperative that you undertake some research to identify the right trade show so that you get a good return on your investment. There are many ways in which you can research a show’s success before you book or design any trade show stands.

Publications like ‘Exhibition Bulletin’ will list shows by venue, industry type and time of year. Exhibition Bulletin runs regular features such as Audit Watch. Here you will be able to see which trade shows are in decline and which shows are improving their attendance levels and exhibitor numbers. By speaking to the organisers you should be able to get hold of previous year’s exhibition catalogues to see which clients are rebooking their trade show stands and which ones are not. It is always a good idea to speak to these companies to find out why they have rebooked their trade show stand, who attends the show and how successful it was for them. Obviously you need to make sure that the types of visitors are right for your organisation and products or services.

Resources & Information Available

Online Resources to Source Trade Shows

·        AllConferences.com

·        BizTradeShows.com

·        Bvents.com

·        CantonFair.org.cn

·        Conferensum.com

·        EventsEye.com

·        EventsinAmerica.com

·        Exhibitions.co.uk

·        ExpoCentral.com

·        ExpoDatabase.com

·        ExpoPromoter.com

·        ExpoFairs.com

·        GlobalSources.com

·        TheTradeshowCalendar.com

·        TheWholesaleForums.co.uk

·        Tradeshow.alibaba.com

·        TSSN.com

See more at Trade-Show-Advisor.com

ExpoPromoter.com

ExpoFairs.com

GlobalSources.com

MyTradeFairs.com

TheTradeshowCalendar.com

TheWholesaleForums.co.uk

Tradeshow.alibaba.com

TradeShowPlaza.com

TradeShowWeek.com

TSNN.com

Create Your Own Database of Exhibitions

Create your own company database of exhibitions with pertinent information, so that it is easy to review which are suitable to attend such as:

  • Year quarter
  • Start and finish date
  • Name of event
  • Theme of trade show
  • City & country
  • Venue
  • Website
  • Organiser contact
  • Target industries
  • Target audience
  • Budget cost to exhibit – space only, shell system
  • Number of attendees in previous year
  • Speaker opportunities
  • Final call for papers date
  • Is sponsorship available?

The above suggestions should assist in making your decision to which Trade Show to exhibit at easier.

Advertisements

Conference and Seminar Tip: Risk Assessment, Health and Safety, Insurance and Contingency Planning

Event management is much about managing risks as it is the event itself. Event Managers have to expect the unexpected and for this planning and preparation are the best tools. You need to have a contingency plan in place for various scenarios. The skill of an organiser is to negotiate the optimum solution in each scenario and finding what is best and safest for the client.

Risk assessment information can be gathered during the pre-event delegates registration and site visit to venue:

  • Each delegate should be asked details of their dietary requirements and any allergies, and medical conditions that you need to be aware of, as well as emergency contact and name of next of kin. If delegates are arriving from abroad then they must take out travel and health insurance.
  • You should arrange to have people on-site at the event who have first aid training. You need to know who they are. Check with the venue who they have who are first aid trained. If it is an outdoor event with a significant risk of personal injury have an ambulance in attendance, for example from St John’s Ambulance. If the event is residential then a note of a doctor on call with contact details, the nearest medical centre address and phone number, and the nearest hospital with address and phone number. The organiser should make the delegates aware of the emergency numbers.
  • During the venue site visit the venue should explain the procedure of what to do and where to assemble if a fire happens, or where the safest place to go is if there is a bomb scare etc. You also need to know if there is a fire alarm test during the event. Before the start of any meeting you should inform the delegates where the emergency exits are and where to assemble if an alarm be sounded. Special attention should be given before the event to any delegates with disability who may require assistance in the case of an emergency.

Measuring Risks as part of the Risk Assessment of an Event

  • Part of the planning process for any event is to assess the risk factors of the event and make sure you have implemented a process for managing each of the risks. The process should specify who is responsible for dealing with the risk and how it will be managed. Risk will vary in severity and likelihood and this will be different for different types of events and locations. See this document for an example: Risk Assessment form for a seminar with space to define contingency plans.

The Risk Assessment should include:

  • Hazards:these can include a missing person, loss or theft of property, catering and delegate’s diets, health and safety, travel and transport, site environments of both the meeting venue, accommodation and off-site venues plus general welfare.
  • Other items to be included in a risk assessment include: who might be harmed and how, the procedure and protocols to follow, how high the risk is, what further action needs to be carried out and who is responsible for the action and following the procedure through.

Event Insurance

Every event organised should have insurance cover. There are plenty of insurance companies that specifically cover events and you can choose the level of cover required. If participating as a third party at an event check the insurance of the organising company or venue.

Special Event Insurance is recommended to protect against the financial risk associated with organising or attending events. Cover includes Event Cancellation Insurance which protects against cancellation or postponement due to adverse weather, communicable diseases, volcanic ash cloud, terrorism and civil unrest.

Non Appearance Insurance covers non-appearance of key speakers at a conference, a band or singer at a concert. Event Liability Insurance covers Public Liability and Employers Liability and Event Property Insurance protects event organisers against damage or loss of owned or hired-in equipment. Event Property Insurance can cover marquees, audio-visual equipment, communication equipment and more.

Further information:

http://www.hse.gov.uk/event-safety/managing-an-event.htm

http://www.swale.gov.uk/events-risk-assessment/

 

Tips how to run a Successful Conference: Event Management and Planning Logistics, The invitation Process

The Invitation Process

 The marketing and creativity side of the invitation process was covered in part 4 of tips; here we will concentrate on the process.

the invitation is not only a way of inviting delegates but also a way to confirm name and contact address of potential delegate and open a dialogue for further communications before and after the event.

for this you need a database, depending on the event this can be a database of your own employees, a prospect list from your CSR system, sales records, website inquiries about your products or services, commercial lists although these are not always so successful and you cannot always know how clean and up to date these are.  Third party lists from your partner or distributors, can also be invited.  Remember you need to invite far more people than you actually want to attend and there is often a 25% drop out rate.

Software products are available on the market for the actual process of administrating the attendees, and if you do several events a year it is worthwhile investing in a package.

The invitation mailing should be creative and follow the theme of the event, it should encourage acceptance, and give the essential information an attendee requires before deciding to attend:

  • Name, title, address of delegate
  • Date and location of event, map and rail/road/air connections
  • Start and finish times
  • Theme of the conference and why they should attend
  • Guest speakers if famous or a renowned authority on the subject
  • Personalisation from the conference sponsors
  • Reply device, with space for delegate contact details and any special needs

the timing of sending out the invitation is important and this should be built into your invitation plan and further reminders of the event should also be planned before the event and added to your time line.  Certain audiences may require at least three months notice of the event, with reminders sent out to the undecided as you near the event.

confirmation of attendance, this should be done immediately as you need to build up a communication channel to the delegate leading up to the event both to promote your company and also to reduce the inevitable drop-out rate.  Communication should be regular and involve email messages, news letters telephone and further details on the programme, joining instructions, travel and accommodation details, hospitality arrangements and other relevant information you would like the delegate to receive before the event.  If you are using web based registration you can add their own personal login and ability to communicate with other attendees and find out information on the event.

the registration system will be used to create badges for the delegates that can be created by the software package you are using and colour coordinated if required to show the different categories of delegates, sponsors, speakers, staff, exhibitors etc.

The delegate attendee list will also be created from the registration list and can be analysed and produced as required.  The contact list is most important if there is a crisis during the event and should be up to date and available to all those concerned in dealing with a situation if the needs arises.

Tips on how to run a successful conference: Part 4B Marketing the invitation process

In the previous blog on Marketing for a conference we looked at the promotion of the event and included tips on offline promotion and online promotion in this blog we will look at the invitation process and ideas on how encourage delegates to attend.

The invitation process for your conference needs to be efficient and professional

  • For larger events use software products to manage the invitation process which sends out invitations, gather delegate data, and will show who needs to be followed up if they have not responded and produce statistical analysis.
  • You need to build a suitable database from raw lists, customer lists, prospect lists, that are targeted to the audience you wish to attend the event.  The database will need to be cleaned to make sure that all the contact details are correct.  You need to invite far more people than you wish to attend the event as sometimes it can be only 25% of acceptance.
  • Make sure all employees are promoting the event at every opportunity when talking to clients and potential customers, third parties.
  • You want people to know about the event ASAP so a teaser or keep this date free can be useful before the main invitation is sent.  The more notice people can have of the event the better, sometimes this can be 3 months before the event other circumstance 3-4 weeks.  Remember reminders for those that have not accepted need to be built into the invitation process this can be by email, telemarketing phone follow up.
  • Confirmation to invitees is very important for those who have accepted, you need to build up a communications channel to reduce inevitable drop out.  Communications can include email messages, telephone, more detail on the programme and joining instructions.

How to get delegates to attend

Delegates will only attend after they find out’ what is in it for me’

  • Spell out the benefits
  • Offer an incentive or discount
  • Offer them a valuable bonuses
  • Make your event irresistible stress the benefits, offer worth while bonus material and state their value or an  incentive for attending your events, such as discount on early bookings
  • Focus strongly on how specifically your event helps to improve the lives of attendees
  • Get other people and organizations to promote your event, look into sponsoring the event with another organizations.  Target other businesses, suppliers, distributors to invite attendees from their own database
  • Work with local press t raise your company’s profile, build relationships with local radio, look at free publicity in newspapers and magazines, send out a press release
  • Measure effectiveness of everything you do, so that you know what works or does not for the next event

Further blogs on how to run a successful business event that has ROI will follow.  To receive these valuable ideas and make sure that you do not miss any of the blogs please sign up we will deliver them to your in-box free.  The blogs will be full of tips and ideas, to help you and your business in event management.

Reference reading:

John G Fisher – How to run a Successful Conference

Philip Calvert – Successful Seminar Selling